Cambridge Journal of Latin American Studies – November 2011 Issue

Cambridge Journal of Latin American Studies presents recent research in the field of Latin American studies in economics, geography, politics, international relations, sociology, social anthropology, economic history and cultural history. Regular features include articles on contemporary themes, specially commissioned commentaries and an extensive section of book reviews.

November 2011 Issue Articles:

Research ArticleManagerialism in Motion: Lessons from Oaxaca, Mexico. JOHN PAUL JONES III, SUSAN M. ROBERTS and OLIVER FRÖHLING

Abstract: Non-governmental organisations operate as nodes in networks of ‘managerialism’ – bundles of often Northern, corporate-inspired knowledge and practices that promote ‘good governance’ under neoliberalism. Managerialism is double-sided: it can guard against corruption and help ensure accountability, but it can also be culturally disjunctive, reinforcing North–South power imbalances while diffusing the political potential of NGOs. In this paper we present a framework for studying managerialism’s global circulation and discuss a series of empirical findings from a multi-year study of NGOs in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. We conclude by commenting on managerialism’s influence on NGOs during the social upheavals of 2006, highlighting its differential and contingent impact on social and political change in Oaxaca. Access this article here.

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Research ArticleThe Power of Persuasion: Issue Framing and Advocacy in Argentina AMY RISLEY

Abstract: This article examines the collective action frames that civil societal actors in Argentina have used while engaging in advocacy. It argues that by devising effective framing strategies, members of civil society organisations increase their chances of participating in the agenda-setting, formulation and adoption phases of policy-making. The relationship between framing and participation is supported by a comparative analysis of two cases of advocacy: the campaign for a freedom of information law and the struggle for child protection legislation. The evidence suggests that civil societal actors often rely on the strength of their ideas and their persuasive power to achieve political relevance, which is analytically distinct from political outcomes. Access this article here.

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Research Article: Transitional Justice and Protracted Accountability in Re-democratised Uruguay, 1985–2011 . LUIS RONIGER

Abstract: This article analyses the protracted process by which democratised Uruguay has come to terms with its legacy of human rights violations. Central to this process has been the nature of Uruguayan transitional policies and their more recent partial unravelling. Due to the negotiated transition to electoral democracy, civilian political elites approached the transitional dilemma of balancing normative expectations and political contingency by promulgating legal immunity, for years avoiding initiatives to pursue trials or launch an official truth commission, unlike neighbouring Argentina. A constellation of national and transnational factors (including recurrent initiatives by social and political forces) eventually opened up new institutional ground for belated truth-telling and accountability for some historical wrongs – and yet, attempts to challenge the blanket legal impunity failed twice through popular consultation and in a recent parliamentary vote. Each time, the government officially projected a narrative that sacralised national consensus and reconciliation, now enshrined in two sovereign popular votes, and the adoption of a forward-looking democratic perspective. Access this article here.

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Research ArticlePress Representation of Social Movements: Brazilian Resistance to the Candonga Hydroelectric Dam . PATRÍCIA PEREIRA DA SILVA and FRANKLIN DANIEL ROTHMAN

Abstract: This article analyses how the Brazilian Movimento dos Atingidos por Barragens (Movement of Dam-Affected People, MAB) has been represented in the press, in the context of networks of resistance to large hydroelectric dams in Latin America. We analyse how the press deploys linguistic-discursive resources in producing and constructing meaning and focus in its presentation of news about anti-dam protests. The study analyses print media reporting on anti-dam protests in Minas Gerais between 1998 and 2005, and shows how, at different moments and in different political contexts, representations of social protest have changed and newspaper reports have either ignored, criminalised or provided visibility to MAB in this region. Access this article here.

CommentaryIs Economic Reform Dead in Latin America? Rhetoric and Reality since 2000 . BARBARA STALLINGS and WILSON PERES

Abstract: Literature published a decade ago reflected a pessimistic view of the market-oriented reforms that Latin America carried out in the 1980s and 1990s, and many politicians have attacked these reforms openly. Indeed, the atmosphere is so negative that it would be reasonable to assume that many of the reforms have been reversed. This paper will take a new look at the situation ten years later. Our argument is that the reforms have generally not been reversed. The reversal that has occurred has been with respect to privatisation in a few countries; negative public opinion is also concentrated on privatisation; and the reforms helped to enable Latin America to take advantage of favourable conditions leading to high growth in the 2004–8 boom period and a relatively strong performance during the 2008–9 crisis. While much remains to be done to raise growth and improve distribution, objective information about the reforms is needed when policies for the future are made. Access this article here.

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Book Release: Aviva Chomsky, A History of the Cuban Revolution (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011). Review.

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Book Release: Karen Kampwirth (ed.), Gender and Populism in Latin America: Passionate Politics (University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2010). Review.

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Book Release: Alcira Dueñas, Indians and Mestizos in the ‘Lettered City’: Reshaping Justice, Social Hierarchy, and Political Culture in Colonial Peru (Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado, 2010). Review.

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Book Release: Adam Warren, Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peru: Population Growth and the Bourbon Reforms (Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2010). Review.

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Book Release: Patricia Lopes Don, Bonfires of Culture: Franciscans, Indigenous Leaders, and the Inquisition in Early Mexico, 1524–1540 (Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2010), pp. xiii+263, $34.95, hb. preview

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Book Release:Arnold J. Bauer, The Search for the Codex Cardona: On the Trail of a Sixteenth-Century Mexican Treasure (Durham, NC, and London: Duke University Press, 2010). Preview

Book Release: Eleanor Wake, Framing the Sacred: The Indian Churches of Early Colonial Mexico (Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2010), pp. xxi+338, $65.00, hb. preview

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Book Release: Nicola Foote and René D. Harder Horst (eds.), Military Struggle and Identity Formation in Latin America: Race, Nation, and Community during the Liberal Period) University Press of Florida, 2010). preview

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Book Release: Paul K. Eiss, In the Name of El Pueblo: Place, Community and the Politics of History in Yucatán (Durham, NC, and London: Duke University Press, 2010). preview

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Book Release: Paula Alonso, Jardines secretos, legitimaciones públicas: el Partido Autonomista Nacional y la política argentina de fines del siglo XIX(Buenos Aires: Edhasa, 2010), pp. 390, pb. preview

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Book Release: María Inés Tato and Martín O. Castro (eds.), Del Centenario al peronismo: dimensiones de la vida política argentina (Buenos Aires: Imago Mundi, 2010), pp. viii+48, pb. preview

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Book Release: Thomas Rogers, The Deepest Wounds: A Labor and Environmental History of Sugar in Northeast Brazil (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2010). preview

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Book Release: Paulo Drinot, The Allure of Labor: Workers, Race, and the Making of the Peruvian State (Durham, NC, and London: Duke University Press, 2011), pp. xi +310, £67.00, £16.99 pb. preview

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Book Release: Cristina Ewig, Second-Wave Neoliberalism: Gender, Race and Health Sector Reform in Peru (University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2010), pp. xiv+255, $67.95, hb. preview

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Book Release: Jacinta Palerm Viqueira and Tomás Martínez Saldaña (eds.),Aventuras con el agua: la administración del agua de riego, historia y teoría (Texcoco, Mexico: CONACYT, 2009), pp. xxii+435, pb. preview

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Book Release: Aaron W. Navarro, Political Intelligence and the Creation of Modern Mexico, 1938–1954) University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2010)1, $64.95, hb. preview

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Book Release: Claire Brewster and Keith Brewster, Representing the Nation: Sport and Spectacle in Post-Revolutionary Mexico (London and New York: Routledge, 2010), pp. 177, £80.00, hb. preview

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Book Release: Gavin O’Toole, The Reinvention of Mexico: National Ideology in a Neoliberal Era (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2010), pp. 302, £65.00, hb. preview

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Book Release: Dina Berger and Andrew Grant Wood (eds.), Holiday in Mexico: Critical Reflections on Tourism and Tourist Encounters (Durham, NC, and London: Duke University Press, 2010), pp. 393, £67.00, £16.99 pb. preview

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Book Release: Héctor Domínguez-Ruvalcaba and Ignacio Corona (eds.), Gender Violence at the U.S.–Mexico Border: Media Representation and Public Response (Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press, 2010), pp. 200, $50.00, hb. preview

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